IMPACT OF SOCIAL MEDIA ON MENTAL HEALTH OF STUDENTS

Main Article Content

Kinza Haroon

Abstract

The world today is like a global village. It has become an INFOBAHN. Each and every single person is connected with one another just by this vast network which is introduced by internet. Internet has made humans global citizens.


Marshall McLuhan said about internet that;


“ The new electronic independence recreates the world in the image of global village.”


There was a time when people were bound to share their thoughts, ideas, emotions, feelings and many more things with one another by long distances. But at present, just because of internet and social media, these barricades cannot stop the flow of information and knowledge across the world. Because this new technical world allows free sharing of thoughts and information among different people living in different areas of the world. Social media has taken part in almost all different types of online networking. It has made the teenagers more sophisticated and more civilized just by upgrading them, by social associations and even by specialized skills, so it is not wrong to call social media as a routine movement (Horst H. 2014).


As it is known that social networking sites are comparatively brand new spectacle and phenomenon, but still there are numerous probes investigating about the mental health and problems of students these problems and issues are still remain unsettled (Igor Pantic 2014).


Therefore, this specific research undergoes the impact of social media on the mental health issues of students that how and for how long they use social media and what changes has come in them.

Article Details

How to Cite
Kinza Haroon. (2022). IMPACT OF SOCIAL MEDIA ON MENTAL HEALTH OF STUDENTS. JOURNAL OF APPLIED LINGUISTICS AND TESOL, 5(1), 14-23. Retrieved from http://jalt.com.pk/index.php/JALT/article/view/616
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Articles

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